History

Chronology History of Early Transportation
1859- 1885

July 1, 1859 River & Lake Shore City Railway Organized.

August 1, 1859 Petition to Common Council for street railway from North Point to Walker’s Point Bridge, Cyrus D. Davis, President.

October 31, 1859 Ordinance given to Fifth and Eighth ward to operate south from Walker’s Point Bridge to Layton House.

November 2, 1859 Building schedule January 1st between Walker’s Point Bridge and Prospect Street. July to hospital at North Point.

November 14, 1859 West Side Passenger Railway Company Incorporated to operate a street railway along W. Water and 3rd Streets with branches on Florida eastward, Chestnut, and northwest into city.

November 24, 1859 Articles of Incorporation for River & Lake Shore City Railway filed with State of Wisconsin.

November 28, 1859 Ground broke for River & Lake Shore City track work. Tracks to commence about 100 feet from Walker’s Point Bridge, up E. Water Street, up Wisconsin Street past Post Office.

December 7, 1859 Rail arrived on Lake Shore Railroad and work would be pushed ahead rapidly.

April 27, 1860 Ground broke up to Custom House.

April 28, 1860 Rails being laid in East Water and Wisconsin Streets.

May 2, 1860 Two 2-horse cars of Kimball & Gorton (Phila.) arrived by lake steamer from Buffalo where they were displayed earlier in the month of May. Are buff colored with light blue panels, 9-windows, 16 feet long.

May 8, 1860 Waiting for 20,000 tons of rail to be delivered.

May 30, 1860 Two cars were run from just south of Wisconsin Street on East Water up the hill past the post office (at NW corner of Milwaukee St.) at 5 p.m. while pulled by four horses each. Alex Easton of Cincinnati was superintendent and John Myers was engineer and contractor. River & Lake Shore City Railway.

June 1, 1860 Boys are already climbing all over the cars “Dangerously.”

June 5, 1860 Cars are now running on Division Street.

June 10, 1860 Over 3,362 passengers paid $168.10 to ride while hundreds turned away. 5 cent fare.

June 12, 1860 2/3 of distance finished and still only two cars on River & Lake Shore City Railway.

June 18, 1860 Spring Street & Cold Spring City Railway Company Incorporated Friday night by ordinance to build on Spring Street to city’s western line, thence north to Cold Spring Grounds in time for September for grand exhibition of the Wisconsin Agriculture & Michigan Association.

June 26, 1860 Tracks laid on Prospect Street for River & Lake Shore City Railway.

Over 3,362 passengers paid $168.10 to ride while hundreds turned away. 5 cent fare.

June 10, 1860

July 4, 1860 Between the 4th and 5th, thousands of people on railway for rides.

July 11, 1860 Harbor, Main Street & Humboldt Horse Railway Asks the city common council to run on Main Street (Broadway) from river, up Martin Street (State) 2 or 3 blocks, then north to vicinity of Humboldt Bridge.

July 25, 1860 Ties laid up to Point Minnewawa, about 3 miles from Walker’s Point Bridge. Plans to extend track up to E. Water Street to Division, thence through 1st ward to vicinity of Humboldt Park for River & Lake Shore City Railway.

August 17, 1860 Application to city common council from West Water Street Horse Railway Company for a street railway from Chicago Road Depot through 3rd Street to city limits with branches on Walnut Street to Fond du Lac Avenue, on Florida Street, and on W. Water Street.

September 13, 1860 Ground broke to extend horse railway on E. Water to Chestnut Street (Juneau) for River & Lake Shore City Railway.

September 22, 1860 New cars received from John Stephenson of New York.

October 18, 1860 Two new 1-horse cars received from Murphy & Allison to carry traffic on E. Water Street division.

January 14, 1861 Ordinance given to Fair Grounds Railway Company for Chestnut Street from 3rd Street along Vliet Street to 28th Street to fairgrounds.

October 1, 1864 Milwaukee City Railway Company organized with John Plankinton, President, W.S. Johnson manager, with renewed plans to go southwest to Forest Home Cemetery via Muskego Avenue, northwest to Fond du Lac Avenue and city limits from Chestnut Street Bridge, and west from Spring Street Bridge to city limits. $100,000 capital with provisions to acquire River & Lake Shore City Railway.

March 28, 1865 Bill passes both houses of State of Wisconsin legislature above objectives of Milwaukee City Railway, and which creates a new company by state charter.

July 17, 1865 Extension of tracks to Florida Street on Reed Street via Huron Street and West Water Street Bridge. Four new cars include two omnibus bodies, one mounted on turntable. Some of the Prospect Street track removed as planned Milwaukee City Railway Company.

July 18, 1865 Board of Council to allow Milwaukee City Railway to take up portion of track on Prospect Street.

July 29, 1865 Streetcars now run on Reed Street up Florida to Hanover (S.3rd Street).

August 5, 1865 Lynch’s Steam Car was tried out on Prospect Street. But no brakes.

October 7, 1865 Tracks on Elizabeth Street (National Avenue) extended from Florida on Greenbush (S. 4th) to Elizabeth.

October 13, 1865 Davis Bus round trip fares are 50 cents from Main (Broadway) and Michigan to Forest Home Cemetery on Sunday afternoons. Streetcar fare raised from 5 cents to 6 cents.

December 13, 1865 Francis S. Blodgett becomes superintendent and plans to extend track up West Water to Chestnut. A new “course” is planned: Going up E. Water to Division, across Chestnut Street Bridge, down West Water, across Spring Street Bridge, down East Water, across Huron Street Bridge, down West Water to Reed Street and towards the cemetery. In this way, no waiting would be required “at switches.”

Bill passes both houses of State of Wisconsin legislature above objectives of Milwaukee City Railway, and which creates a new company by state charter.

March 28, 1865

April 26, 1866 Superintendent Blodgett leased lot at corner of Fond du Lac & Walnut to build car-barn upon it immediately. Plan to build line from Chestnut Street Bridge down 3rd Street & W. Water to Clybourn connection with the present line. East Water Street branch to be extended across Walker’s Point Bridge as double track down Ferry Street, along S. Water Street to Reed Street to connect with the South Side branch.

May 16, 1866 Extensive addition to car-barns (72 x 176 feet) and (66 x 144 feet) at foot of East Water and corner of Erie Street to accommodate additional horse cars, including 10 new Stephenson cars received June 16, 1866, that can seat 30 passengers.

June 16, 1866 Route opened with one-way traffic of cars north from South Water up Reed and West Water Streets (across Menomonee River Bridge), across Chestnut Street Bridge, and continued one-way south of E. Water across Walker’s Point Bridge on Ferry and South Water Streets. Back to Reed Street: about 2 ½ miles. Branch routes northeast to North Point; southwest to Elizabeth (National) and 6th Avenue (S. 11th Street); northwest to Quentin’s Park (vicinity of 7th Street on Walnut Street). Milwaukee City Railway Company.

June 22, 1866 People are already complaining that the full 1-hour trip is too long and inconvenience because only one way.

October 4, 1866 Barn & Car house enclosed in brick to improve appearance.

June 16, 1867 Streets goes two way traffic with turnouts spread around system.

July 4, 1867 Record set with 76 passengers carried on a single car, while over 3,000 joy ride.

October 8, 1867 First feeder buses on the Milwaukee City Railway from the southern terminus to Forest Home Cemetery on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons.

January 14, 1868 Notice was given for withdrawal of cars on Hill Branch because of insufficient winter patronage, until further notice.

April 8, 1868 Plans to double track on East Water Street. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

Record set with 76 passengers carried on a single car, while over 3,000 joy ride.

July 4, 1867

February 4, 1869 A 48-hour storm prompted the use of a large party sleigh on Prospect Street division.

July 21, 1869 City of Milwaukee ants Milwaukee City Railway to take up old track on 3rd, West Water and Reed Streets.

August 3, 1869 Milwaukee City Railway carried 80,000 passengers between Elizabeth & Walnut Streets in July.

August 18, 1869 Milwaukee City Railway is planking between tracks on Wisconsin Street.

December 24, 1869 Milwaukee City Railway will replace its coaches with Roberts Sleds on the hill route.

February 12, 1870 Milwaukee City Railway is going to withdraw Bob-Sled Buses and replace its cars on Prospect Street.

March 16, 1870 Bob Sled Buses are used during a heavy snow fall again.

May 11, 1870 Milwaukee City Railway is going to lay extra tracks from Walker Point Bridge to Mason Street.

May 13, 1870 Injunction against laying double track through East Water Street.

May 30, 1870 Milwaukee City Railway wants to take track up on East Water because the grade north of Mason Street to be improved. Tracks to be placed in 14-ft center of West Water Street.

June 9, 1870 Water (Plankinton) to be double tracked from Chestnut to Reed Streets. Ground broken on W. Water Street below Chestnut for double track to Reed Street. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

June 22, 1870 Double track on West Water Street to be completed by July 4th. East Water tracks to be abandoned to Prospect Street.

July 21, 1870 Cars leave corner of Wisconsin & East Water Streets for Walker Point Bridge & terminus on Prospect.

November 13, 1870 East Side cars leave each end of the line every 20 minutes. It takes 5 minutes to get to Wisconsin & East Water, another 5 minutes to get to the Court House (from S. terminus).

January 12, 1871 Milwaukee City Railway started to lay double track on East Water as soon as Market Street is graded and paved.

January 16, 1871 Supreme Court rules in favor of Milwaukee City Railway’s public access to East Water Street & reverses original injunction against Milwaukee City Railway by street proprietors who complained that they would not be able to back their teams with wagons or drays into curbs.

April 27, 1871 A turntable was installed at the foot of E. Water Street to do away with intrusive frogs and side tracks near approach to Walker’s Point Bridge.

May 13, 1871 Car house fire with 11cars and 4 buses lost. Five cars were safe because out on the line, one was scorched which was repaired and running by the 17th.

May 16, 1871 East Side Line is for sale by Milwaukee City Railway. No cars are running because of the fire.

May 20, 1871 Milwaukee City Railways sells 150, $25 personal passes to purchase 4 cars for the Hill line. Cars arrived Mid-August: 4 from John Stephensen, 18-20 passengers, cream colored striped in Red & Green.

June 3, 1871 Milwaukee City Railway is rebuilding the car house destroyed by fire.

August 3, 1871 A turntable is being installed at the intersection of Wisconsin & East Water Streets by Milwaukee City Railway Company.

August 11, 1871 Milwaukee City Railway plans new line from head of State Street over State Street Bridge to West Water and westward in time for State Fair.

October 24, 1871 An ordinance requiring fares to be returned to 5 cents.

Car house fire with 11cars and 4 buses lost. Five cars were safe because out on the line, one was scorched which was repaired and running by the 17th.

May 13, 1871

February 15, 1872 Streetcars are elaborately carpeted with hay.

March 26, 1872 Two large open cars are to run this summer. They will have a canvas roof and can carry 2 to 3 times more passengers.

May 7, 1872 Fire at car-barn a small shed to the rear of the stables burned.

August 19, 1872 Street railway omnibuses leave Elizabeth Street for Forest Home Cemetery at 3:15 p.m., Tuesday, Friday and Saturday.

October 7, 1872 Report that Milwaukee City Railway was purchased by Isaac Ellsworth & Lynch. Wants also to extend to Bay View.

October 11, 1872 Milwaukee City Railway has 6.5 miles of track. Wants to remove East Water Street track to Broadway. Ordinance granting right of way to Bay View and to Forest Home Cemetery.

November 1, 1872 Horse disease affects all of 100 horse but 4 of Milwaukee City Railway.

January 1, 1873 Ellsworth & Lynch assume proprietorship of Milwaukee City Railway. All cars being scrubbed & cleaned immediately & new one-horse cars to be built for the West Side line to double service there.

January 13, 1873 Salt being used liberally on rails.

March 26, 1873 Snow plows being used to clear tracks of snow drifts.

April 4, 1873 Track planking on West Water Street being repaired.

April 9, 1873 East Water Street track from Walker’s Point Bridge to Wisconsin Street being re-laid.

April 13, 1873 Lynch sells out his partnership to Ellsworth.

May 11, 1873 Milwaukee City Railway starts to build their own cars.

October 23, 1873 To issue half-fare tickets for children.

November 13, 1873 Threatening to discontinue East Side line if not better patronized. East Side cars are halted shortly thereafter for winter. DeGuenther jumps right in and runs his buses on the East Side line.

November 19, 1873 New barns open on 2nd Street, cars switch off main line on West Water through alley north of Caswell Block.

December 10, 1873 Tearing down old building on Erie Street.

Report that Milwaukee City Railway was purchased by Isaac Ellsworth & Lynch. Wants also to extend to Bay View.

October 7, 1872

February 12, 1874 The old stables on Erie Street collapse because of the heavy snow.

February 17, 1874 New office and waiting room to be built on West Water Street.

March 21, 1874 Axle broke and car lurched over in true railway style.

April 15, 1874 DeGuenther want to add buses to the East Side route and to Whitefish Bay.

April 24, 1874 Milwaukee City Railway is leveling its East Water Street track.

April 27, 1874 John Staub’s buses to begin trips to Forest Home Cemetery from 4th Avenue (S. 9th Street) terminus on Elizabeth Street on Tuesdays, Fridays and Sundays.

May 2, 1874 Van Buren residents want the East Side track removed.

May 11, 1874 East Side citizens’ had a meeting with Ellsworth to discuss several proposals to either continue existing line or to relocate East Side route. Ellsworth wants $6,000 in subscriptions.

May 12, 1874 West Side Street Railway Company Petitioned the Common Council by Tesch, Plankinton for horse railway on Spring Street from the River to city limits and north between 8-16th Streets to State and Vliet Street and to city limits on these streets. Organizers are: J. Plankinton, Sherbune S. Merrill, John Tesch and Washington Becker.

May 25, 1874 Track being removed from East Water Street by board of public works.

June 1, 1874 East Water Street being repaved by Ellsworth.

June 15, 1874 Ellsworth lays double track in Reed Street (along this principle south side business street) from South Water Street by railroad crossing, starting in middle of last night and throughout the day to avoid injunctions. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

July 6, 1874 Milwaukee City Railway is paving with wood blocks between tracks while city is doing the rest. Reed from Menomonee River Bridge to Florida.

July 14, 1874 East Side Horse Railway wants to build on East Water or Broadway, and Wisconsin or Mason Streets. On route from North Street, through south side of Bay View. $5,000 has already been subscribed for the Mason Street route. Railroad Committee of the City of Milwaukee has concerns over Mason-Broadway amendment because permission was already granted on Wisconsin & East Water Street. Ordinance amended to give a company choice of routes from North Street to south side.

Report that Milwaukee City Railway was purchased by Isaac Ellsworth & Lynch. Wants also to extend to Bay View.

October 7, 1872

August 3, 1874 Milwaukee City Railway wants an ordinance to extend to Maple Street on Reed Street for a Bay View route. Now that East Side Horse Railway has made its intentions know to go to Bay View. But Bay Viewers want lines on both Clinton (for an east side connection) and Reed Street (for a west side connection). However, track gauge should be the narrower 4’8 ½” throughout the city and not just as proposed on east side route, it was urged.

August 8, 1874 Four men were canvassing business portions of the city for subscription to stock of the East Side Horse Railway and reported good success.

August 10, 1874 Milwaukee common council, after much argument over which railway shall build Bay View route, it was given an ordinance to Milwaukee City Railway to build south of Reed Street.

August 10, 1874 An ordinance to Milwaukee City Railway for Reed Street extension to the south. However, Milwaukee City Railway’s broad track gauge is not desirable because 19 of 20 wagons use 4’8 ½” gauge which is to be used by Cream City Railway which competed for a south side route (via Clinton/ S. 1st.)

August 12, 1874 A meeting of stockholders of the East Side & Bay View Company (F. Van Valkenburg, Chairman, James B. Turck, Secretary): The meeting was called because the Milwaukee City Railway was given the route on Reed Street & because enough capital to build line from Albion on Brady Street to Wisconsin & East Water Streets, or should the line be built quickly on Clinton to discourage Milwaukee City Railway on Reed Street. Spencer (of Spencer’s Business College) moved to have committee of Turck, Van Valkenburg, H.S. Mack and James H. Hoes draft articles of association and apply for state charter. Route to be decided later, proposal including: Single track from Iron Company office at Bay View to Brady, and double track from Allis’s foundry to Van Buren on Jackson for $115-120 thousand; From Wisconsin Street to Albion with double track with 4 cars and 16 horses for $32,500 plus $1,000 more to Brady, omitting turnouts. The Division, Chestnut, Winnebago route was discussed. It was decided to solicit subscriptions for Wisconsin, Brady tracks to gain public confidence.

August 17, 1874 Thirty subscribers meet at Spencer’s Business College and drew up an ordinance & approved Articles of Incorporation to be signed by Christian Preusser & J.B. Turck (1st Ward), Daniel Schulz (4th Ward), Louis Durr (South Side), and Van Valkenburg. Name to be Cream City Railway. From Division & East Water west on Chestnut to southeast corner of Fairgrounds; From Chestnut on Winnebago northeast to 12 crossing Vliet Street; From Clinton on Scott west to 4th Avenue to Mitchell Street; From Kinnickinnic Avenue west on Mitchell & Forest Home to Forest Home Cemetery; Amended to Estend Road on North Water across Humboldt Bridge. Costs: From Wisconsin or Mason with double track to Jackson & single track rest of the way with 4 cars and 16 horses ($33,000); From Wisconsin to Bay View with double track to Allis’s Foundry plus equipment ($60,000); From East Water to 12th Street ($36,500). Builders might take one quarter of the company’s stock. Mr. Goodwin wanted to “Skim off the cream” from the company name. Dr. Robinson blushed when he was asked to pen the papers because of his beautiful script.

August 23, 1874 Meeting of West Side Street Railway at the offices of F.B. Valkenburg: Tesch, Iverson, Watkins, Washington Becker, Harrison, Same Green and Rudolph Nunnemacher. Proposed route: Spring Street Bridge to 10th Street to Wells to City Limits. Double track, 4’10” gauge, 2 and 7/10 miles at a cost of $60,000 ($30,000 already subscribed). 12-foot cars for 2 horses or mules; 8-minute headway. Barns at W. terminus on Wells Street. Contracts to be let out as soon as specifications ready. Road is to be built before the snow flies.

August 24, 1874 Reed Street extension to railroad Street (Greenfield) hoped to be finished with 3 weeks.

August 25, 1874 Van Valkenburg was elected president & J.B. Turck, Secretary of Cream City Railway.

August 26, 1874 Excavation finished to Scott St.

August 26, 1874 Cream City Railway will be laying 10 miles of track and asks for proposals.

September 1, 1874 Remonstrance’s on Vliet, Winnebago & Chestnut Street against horse railways.

September 2, 1874 Turntable in intersection of E. Water & Erie Streets is removed.

September 4, 1874 South side line is finished to Mineral Street.

September 5, 1874 Stockholders of Cream City Railway have a meeting at Spencer’s; Unanimous choice for Mason Street, 276 of 288 voters for Jackson Street. Immediate contract for Brady to East Water construction. If property holders do their duty, then construction to Spring & West Water before winter (with the connection to the West Side Railway) Secretary Turck can be found at 409 Broadway for subscriptions Major stock held: Alex Mitchell $1,000; E. H. Brodhead $1,000; William Wood $1,000; Christian Preusser $1,000; J. B. Turck $1,000; Frank B. Van Valkenburg $1,500; Mrs. A. J. Hathaway $1,000; Charles Munkwitz $500 and Ferdin Kuehn $500. It is hoped that Clinton Street property holders will change their opinion regard the remonstrance issued on their street.

September 8, 1874 Cream City Railway presents amended ordinance to Milwaukee Common Council for approval.

September 13, 1874 West Side Street Railway to begin construction in a few days. Contract to Green and Harrison who wasn’t the lowest bidder. Route: Along Spring Street to 9th Street to Wells to 22nd Street. May also use 11th Street. Line to be built before frost or no obstacles seen. Cars to be used are “Bobtail” type and the line will open before Christmas.

September 18, 1874 Harrison & Green and Hewitt & Hathaway are the contractors to put down track for Cream City Railway from East Water & Wisconsin Streets to Brady Street in 40 days.

September 19, 1874 Ground is broken for West Side Street Railway Company.

September 25, 1874 Milwaukee City Railway is lowering track to grade on 3rd Street from Cherry to Walnut Streets for paving.

October 9, 1874 Ground is broken for the Cream City Railway at the foot of Mason for the east side line. Material was distributed along the line and as soon as good distance is ironed, cars would be placed and making regular trips.

October 10, 1874 First injunction is served to West Side Street Railway by Michael Duffy. He didn’t want tracks in front of his home at northeast corner of 11th & Spring Street, or tracks close than 40 feet from to curb line, or track on 11st, except at center of the street. Duffy claims the company is infringing on his roadway and that he won’t be able to approach his carriage landing safety.

October 12, 1874 West Side Street Railway will abide by its charter rather fight Duffy.

October 14, 1874 Harrison & Green has put down ties as far as Jackson Street. Coaches for the line are being built in Cleveland and should arrive here by November 10 when the Cream City road will open.

October 15, 1874 Track laid on Spring Street from West Water to 7th Street by West Side Street Railway.

October 19, 1874 Cream City Railway tracks are completed to Martin Street.

October 20, 1874 West Side Street Railway on “home stretch” with fine weather.

October 21, 1874 Good weather and work for the Cream City lines is working its way in the 1st ward.

October 25, 1874 Contractor Harrison reports to West Side Street Railway, tracks laid as far as 17th Street with grading to 35th Street. 35 teams & 60 men working on road bed.

October 28, 1874 Cream City tracks are laid to Brady Street and the line will open on November 10th.

October 29, 1874 West Side Baseball Club is negotiating for to enclosed grounds for baseball field near the West Side Street Railway.

Ground is broken for West Side Street Railway Company.

September 19, 1874

November 4, 1874 West Side Street Railway barns to be located at 22nd & Wells.

November 5, 1874 Cars for the Cream City Railway are being shipped from Cleveland.

November 11, 1874 Harrison & Green finished all track to city limits. Rolling stock to consist of 5 cars of improved construction, which are ready for shipment from Cleveland to arrive by close of next week. The stables are almost completed and to be finished in 2 weeks. 30 horse capacity, line to open November 23. West Side Street Railway Company.

November 13, 1874 Four new cars arrived from Cleveland and hauled to the head of Brady Street forenoon. A Milwaukee Sentinel reporter was the first passenger. Double tracks as far as Brady Street. New Car house & Stable being built at the upper terminus of the road for the Cream City Railway.

November 17, 1874 Bus line to run from western terminus to Wauwatosa of West Side Street Railway Company.

November 19, 1874 Turntables are being installed at the upper & lower extremes of the Cream City Railway.

November 22, 1874 First day of regular service on the Cream City Railway.

November 23, 1874 The turntable construction was delayed because of bad weather for the Cream City Railway.

November 24, 1874 Cleveland Company behind with delivery of new cars for West Side Street Railway. Plans are to open on Thanksgiving Day even if they have to borrow rolling stock.

November 25, 1874 McNairy, Claflen Company from Cleveland proved four cars. They are light yellow with gold striping & advertise “Spring, Wells & 34th Sts.” Double track to barns at 22nd Street and single track to 34th Street with turnouts and turntables.

November 26, 1874 A formal opening of the Cream City Railway will be held on November 28th at the south terminus almost across from the Sentinel Building.

November 28, 1874 Car headway decreased from 20 minutes to 10 minutes. First week fare collected for Cream City Railway was $100.53.

December 8, 1874 Whiles November 22th was the first day for regular running of Cream City Railway cars, the full complement of 4 cars was not put on until December 8, 1874. The Company owns 5 cars ($1,000 each), which are 4 hours per day and expected to last 3 years. Cars leave each terminus every 10 minutes and rumble along at the rate of 5 M.P.H. including stops. So far the running expenses of $22.50 per day compare to $27.50 per day receipts. Turntables are located at the foot of Mason and one on Farwell Street at the end. Distance of line is about 1 ¾ miles; with the exception of last half miles on Farwell Street. Track is double track, coat $24,000 for track, $37,000 for total accommodation. Capital: $150,000 with $35,000 already subscribed. Extension is expended in the spring. Total road mileage to 12 miles.

Drivers get $45 per month. They can’t steal because all cars have Slawson patent cash boxes into which passengers deposit nickels. Change boxes containing $25 in cash and tickets are given to each driver in the morning. Slawson boxes cost $165 each. Cars seat 12 adults comfortably and should stand 12 more.

Route: Mason, Jackson, Ogden, Farwell, Brady where it terminates. 20 minutes to get to Brady Street. Barn is 72’x32’ x 26’ feet high has the capacity for 28 horses and 30 tons of hay. Car House: 28’ x 72’ x 24’ feet high. Passenger Depot is under construction.

December 23, 1874 Cream City Railway complete a circuit of the East Side and extensions to Bay View and Forest Home. Connection with Milwaukee City Railway at West Water and Spring from Mason Street. Northeast on Farwell & 1st Avenue to North Street; Down Brady to North Water, southwest to East Water Street across East Water Street Bridge to Ferry Street. Along Ferry Street to either South Water or Lake to either Reed or Clinton; on Reed or Clinton Streets to Kinnickinnic to Lincoln Avenue and Bay View. From Kinnickinnic Avenue to Clinton to Mitchell to Forest Home to City limits.

December 28, 1874 Ordinance passed by Milwaukee Common Council. (As routed under December 23, 1874.)

First day of regular service on the Cream City Railway.

November 22, 1874

February 11, 1875 Snow plows are being used on all city street railways.

February 15, 1875 Daily receipts for Cream City is about $33, costs $22.

February 19, 1875 Cream City Railway pays 5% dividend for half year.

March 2, 1875 Four horses are used to pull cars up 3rd Street hill.

March 8, 1875 Cream City Railway crew engaged in circular work at foot of Mason Street. The thaw has caused the turntable to fill with water which concealed the track.

March 10, 1875 Milwaukee City Railway wants to take up track on Florida & Greenbush Streets and to extend track from Reed to Greenbush on Elizabeth.

May 21, 1875 Bob-tail cars of the Cream City Railway are running down Mason with horses.

June 21, 1875 Double track is on Reed to Elizabeth Streets, and to begin connection west to Greenbush.

June 15, 1875 Cream City Railway is considering extending its track along 1st Avenue to North Street to Water works.

July 21, 1875 Daily receipts for Cream City Railway is now $53, with expenses $25. Track is being considered for the extension to Cold Spring and to Bay View.

July 22, 1875 Cream City Cars on the east side are now fitted with canvas screens behind the wheels under the frame of the floors to catch dust.

August 5, 1875 Cream City Railway is giving serious consideration to the Forest Home extension from East Water Street Terminus to Ferry Street to Forest Home Cemetery. Such travel now supports a “Bus line” Cost at $15,000 per mile and capital stock to come from sale of $25 shares.

August 19, 1875 With the widening of Elizabeth Street from 1st to 8th Avenues (6-13 Streets), Milwaukee City Railway is doubling its track.

August 24, 1875 Cream City success promises to gridiron city with street railways within the year. Clinton to Kinnickinnic to Lincoln to Bay View. Forest Home branch: West on Mitchell from Clinton to Forest Home Avenue to the Cemetery. First line is 3 miles, second is 2 miles, $75,000 needed with $15,000 already on hand. All lines are to be double track. To the present 5 cars and 24 horses will be required additional 10 cars & 50 horses.

Cold Spring extension of 2 miles and $35,000 cost will run north on East Water from Mason, West across Chestnut Street Bridge onto Cold Spring. Construction prices are 10% cheaper this season on wood, iron and labor.

October 2, 1875 South side line is open to Kinnickinnic Avenue.

October 9, 1875 Track and street grade raised between Cedar & State Streets on West Water.

October 20, 1875 Milwaukee City Railway is building all its own streetcars.

October 30, 1875 Ground is broken along East Water Street for the Cream City Railway extension. Fred Y. Horning is the contractor at a cost of $12.475, work is to done by December 1st. Six cars are needed for this extension.

July 1, 1876 Continued grading along West Water Street.

July 15, 1876 Milwaukee City Railway is ready to occupy its new offices on West Water Street.

August 30, 1876 Milwaukee City Railway wants to build line on Railroad Street (Greenfield) from Reed to Forest Home Cemetery via Muskego. This was approved by Railroad Commission, which turned down the same request from Cream City Railway.

Milwaukee City Railway is building all its own streetcars.

October 20, 1875

September 8, 1876 Turntable installed at 3rd & Walnut.

October 15, 1876 Walnut Street line being extended to 12th Street.

November 6, 1875 Double track is laid from Mason to Huron on East Water for the Cream City Railway.

November 12, 1875 Double track is laid to Chicago Street, hoping to reach Erie Street by the weekend, the line is to extend north of East Water Street from Mason to Division Street of the Cream City Railway.

November 29, 1875 Large addition to Farwell barns being put up. Six new coaches ordered. Most of new rail not put on East Water Street by Cream City Railway.

December 13, 1875 Cream City Railway receives 22 new mules.

December 14, 1875 Cream City Railway receives new cars for East Water, Mason and Farwell Streets.

February 14, 1876 Annual meeting for Cream City Railway; Earning of $54 per day this snowless winter (Vs. $33 per day last winter) & $40 per day during the summer. A total of $53,000 was raised and $13,000 needed to cancel debt. Subscriptions are being solicited for Bay View & Chestnut Street lines. Offices at 409 Broadway.

May 15, 1876 Cream City subscriptions for the Vliet line are needed to obtain $23,000.

August 8, 1876 Cream City Railway earned about $30,000 per year. Clinton Street line is being planned. A 400’ x 600’ will be fenced in by Cream City Railway. Tract in Kane’s subdivision in 1st ward for Baseball Park for east siders to use.

August 15, 1876 Ordinance is introduced to Railroad Committee & two local ward committees. This line out to Chestnut Street to southeast corner of Fair Grounds at 27th Street (to be completed by September 1878) to Winnebago to 12th Street crossing Vliet Streets. (To be completed by September 1877).

August 18, 1876 Tracks are 3 inches too high on East Water Street for the Cream City Railway.

August 21, 1876 Cream City Railway called for right of way to be discussed by 2 wards. The 6th Street viaduct is rotting away, about a year left.

August 25, 1876 Cream City Railway seeking bids to build double track on Clinton Street from Lake to Kinnickinnic Avenue to Lincoln Avenue to Bay View. Winnebago route opposed by proprietors who aren’t asked if they wanted a street railway and who insist this street was built for farmers who would have to find another access if this narrow street was taken up with double tracks. Chestnut Street, newly paved, was not considered prime also for tracks by “its owners.” West side residents are reported to want a line up State Street, north on 7th Street, west on Chestnut to 27th Street. Turck was asked to redraft ordinance for State Street-27th Street access to Chestnut because prime business district on Chestnut Street seems opposed east of 7th Street.

Resolution: Ordering last cars on line at 11 p.m. Turck said cars are cut back every 20 minutes at 10 pm and were in at 11 pm- too expensive to put cars out at that hour (11 pm) Committee decided to rule against (Owl Car) resolution.

August 29, 1876 Ordinance postponed for Cream City Railway. West from East Water on Martin Street over State Street bridge & State Street, north of 7th Street to city limits; west on Chestnut from 7th Street to 27th Street & southeast corner of fair grounds. Ordinance referred to Railroad & local committees: West on Railroad (Greenfield) from Clinton to Muskego Avenue, west to Lincoln Avenue & Forest Home Cemetery; south on 8th Avenue from Railroad Street to Forest Home Cemetery.

Cream City Railway earned about $30,000 per year. Clinton Street line is being planned.

August 8, 1876

September 1, 1876 Ground is broken for the south side extension of the Cream City Railway. Local street railway politics. The committee on railway is again facing the problem of competition among the three street railways for lucrative car lines.  Cream City wants route to Fair grounds on Chestnut and would accept a grant west of State Street even as far as the vicinity of 14th Street. Ellsworth of Milwaukee City Railway didn’t car, but John Hinsey said West Side Railway wanted a line on State Street, 11th Street and Vliet to the Cold Spring Grounds.

Cream City views the West Side Railway proposal as an attempt to bar the Cream City because their route is too impractical and zigzagging. But Cream City’s Fair grounds section was unanimously deferred. Railroad Street extension: there was argument that the Milwaukee City Railway came to the south side first and that the people of the west side should have access to Forest Home Cemetery. (Clearly, we still have a divided city with fears that the street railways will serve different city sections unevenly) This section was also postponed. Thus, Cream City Railway was blocked from entering westward into the near north side and near south side territories of the West Side Street Railways.

September 8, 1876 Cream City Railway is setting a turntable at the intersection of Lake & Clinton Streets. Manager Turck provided for bus service between north terminus of this line and the military encampment.

September 10, 1876 Cars of the Cream City Railway are running to Lake & Clinton Streets. Cream City is considering the offer of their Baseball Park on Farwell Avenue to the Milwaukee Athletic Association for a nominal rent.

September 19, 1876 Horse power is being substituted for mule power on Cream City lines.

October 1, 1876 Tracks are completed on Clinton Street to Elizabeth Street (National Avenue) for Cream City.

October 10, 1876 Cream City extends track from Bay View works to Madison Street.

October 14, 1876 Cream City has laid track to Kinnickinnic Bridge and work to Bay View will be done by Tuesday October 17th of next week. Immediately after Bay View line is finished, track will be laid to Forest Home Avenue and will be done this fall.

October 18, 1876 Cream City Cars will run as far as Lincoln Avenue by the early part of next week.

October 21, 1876 Property owners along Vliet & Chestnut Streets are jubilant over the prospect of an adjustment of conflict over the right of way between West Side and Cream City Street Railway Companies.

October 23, 1876 Cream City Railway is laying track to Lincoln Avenue. A half mile south of Kinnickinnic.

October 27, 1876 Cream City is constructing a car house and barn on Lincoln Avenue. The building will house 16 cars and 60 horses. Tracks will be completed to Forest Home Avenue by Saturday evening October 28th.

November 15, 1876 Cream City’s south side barns are finished and the car house will be Saturday evening November 18th. Superintendent Hewitt is in St. Louis to buy mules for the south side line to Bay View. By the close of next week, cars will run regularly over the Bay View extension.

November 28, 1876 Cream City’s first cars from Farwell Avenue to Lincoln Avenue about 5 miles. The 8 minute (headway) will be reduced when the new John Stephensen cars arrive from New York works. The company have also opened the branch out on Mitchell to Forest Home Avenue.

December 5, 1876 West siders want to know if Cream City intends to extend their line up State Street to the west boundary of the city.

Horse power is being substituted for mule power on Cream City lines.

September 19, 1876

January 10, 1877 Cream City Railway will extend the 7 blocks from the present terminus to north up to North Street next spring, and west from East Water & Division over Chestnut Street Bridge to 27th Street.

February 10, 1877 Cream City’s new routes to be: Farwell Avenue & East Water Street (6 cars so marked); From Farwell to Walker Point Bridge, and Division Street & Bay View (7 cars); From Division Street to Lincoln Avenue, with reliable connection promised at Walker’s Point Bridge. 5 cent fare with free transfer. Annual meeting: Cream City has 15 cars, 120 animals, 5 1/2 miles of road, $110,000 invested plus $13,000 in real estate. Almost 3,600 share votes were cast. The Mitchell Street line was shut down because of the epidemic along the route (A street railway-imposed quarantine). Van Valkenburg steps down and is replaced by Winfield Smith as president.

March 20, 1877 Milwaukee City Railway Company goes to Forest Home Cemetery via Railroad Street (Greenfield) and Muskego.

April 20, 1977 The Forest Home feeder buses set to run again from Elizabeth Street terminus by Ellsworth.

April 25, 1877 Cream City principals; Winfield Smith, C.J. Kershan, Christian Preusser to form an independent come to buy or lease Mitchell Street tracks to 8th Avenue and to extend last 6,000 feet up to Forest Home Cemetery. Cost would be about $1 per foot for single track. To run 3-4 cars one either steam car or steam dummy as preferred (cost $3,500). Since this line closes in winter won’t cost much to keep only cars. Can also run 8-10 mph. Fare 5 cents completed by May.

April 27, 1877 The 3rd Street extension to Shooting Park (Garfield Park) to North Street, by next week double track, new cars were ordered for 3rd Street.

May 5, 1877 West Side Street Railway wants to go up 12th Street to State and to city limits. Since 12th Street is only 40 feet wide, property owners are willing to share expense to have the line extended on 11th Street instead.

May 14, 1877 Forest Home Railway Orders Steam Dummy’s from Baldwin Locomotive Works; expects delivery in early June.

May 15, 1877 11th ward residents meet at Kuemmerlein’s at 8th Avenue and Forest Home to discuss new turn of events about Forest Home Railway.

May 29, 1877 Forest Home Railway within a few rods of Cemetery and cars now run out in connection with Cream City Railway.

May 21, 1877 Milwaukee City Railway to get three years to build the Forest Home line, because of sewers on Railroad Street to be built in 1877-78.

May 29, 1877 Construction began on Railroad Street branch via 4th Avenue (S. 9th Street) to Forest Home Railroad at Mitchell Street. Shooting Park (Garfield Park) extension to within 4 blocks of goal and cars run full distance completed to date.

May 29, 1877 Milwaukee City Railway Company begins construction on Reed Street, 3rd Street line up to a block from Shooting Park (Garfield Park).

Milwaukee City Railway to get three years to build the Forest Home line, because of sewers on Railroad Street to be built in 1877-78.

May 21, 1877

June 20, 1877 Cars now running to Mitchell via Railroad Street & 4th Avenue (S. 9th Street).

July 6, 1877 Steam motor arrives for Forest Home Railway.

July 8, 1877 Trial run on Forest Home steam dummy car.

July 13, 1877 Veteran horse for 8 years of service with 3 rows of teeth in lower jaw to become perambulating lawnmower on Dr. Osmond’s farm.

July 14, 1877 Mitchell- Forest Home residents have appointed J. Freitag, Edward Gies & several others to get an injunction against Forest Home Dummy Line to go before Common Council to abolish the steam line.

July 16, 1877 Common council grants Forest Home Railway the right to use dummy for 30 days on trial basis.

July 17, 1877 Injunction is served to halt steam operation of Forest Home line hearing before Judge Mann.

July 30, 1877 Aldermen want to rescind 30-day Dummy trial.

August 2, 1877 Cream City Railway provides 9 cars, the Dummy pulling 4 cars to all Saints Cathedral picnic at Hagerman’s Grove, Bay View.

August 8, 1877 Cream City Railway to extend to East Water Street terminus to North River Street and thence to Pleasant Street Bridge.

August 26, 1877 Baldwin Steam car expected soon by Forest Home Railway.

September 19, 1877 Steam car Baldwin to make regular runs on Forest Home Railway.

September 23, 1877 Steam car runs on east side in a.m. & Forest Home line in afternoon.

October 8, 1877 A burial train for Christian Rahn, killed by lightning at Oakwood, was pulled by the Steam Dummy instead of buses.

October 29, 1877 Common Council trying to consider an ordinance to allow street railways to use steam power.

Baldwin Steam car expected soon by Forest Home Railway.

August 26, 1877

January 10, 1878 New cars arrive from Stephenson delivered to Water Street shops.

February 5, 1878 Forest Home Railway not in operation until spring and will use a steam motor car. Cannot operate profitable with animal power.

April 5, 1878 The large 2nd Street car house was raised 5 feet to handle more cars also stables were added.

April 7, 1878 Steam Dummy service begins pulling 2 cars at a time.

April 10, 1878 A counterfeit mules is used in front of the Forest Home Railway engine. The entire country is laughing. Seems that the Cream City Railway Company is missing a small red mule.

April 26, 1878 Cream City Railway had a streetcar in service as late as 1 o’clock in the morning.

May 9, 1878 Railroad Committee and local people met with Forest Home Railway officers. Residents want Forest Home Railway run regularly- or operate by Milwaukee City Railway. A stuffed mule was declared a nuisance on front of the engine and should provide year around service.

June 7, 1878 Cream City Railways added another car to reduce service to 7 ½ minutes.

June 9, 1878 Forest Home Railway carried 700 people on Decoration Day, using 5 dummy cars to Cemetery hourly.

June 25, 1878 Milwaukee City Railway is building a system of two tracks from West Water Street front to 2nd Street front in its premises. These interconnecting switch tracks to serve as ingresses, storage and quick exits in the event of fire.

June 25, 1878 Cream City Railway officials in Chicago to negotiate for purchase of open cars.

July 29, 1878 A bus load of people capsized on 3rd Street just north of Walnut.

October 10, 1878 Milwaukee City Railway Company cars on Lincoln Avenue.

Cream City Railway had a streetcar in service as late as 1 o’clock in the morning.

April 26, 1878

March 22, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway overhauling 4 cars. Cars run 80 mile per day and are renovated every 3 months.

April 12, 1879 Removing tracks on Walnut Street from 3-7th Streets and building line on State Street from West Water Street to 7th Street and to Walnut Street.

May 5, 1879 New line opens on State Street & 7th Street. Peter Bell given “May drivers Award”.

May 10, 1879 A turntable is installed at the terminus at 4th Avenue and Mitchell Street.

May 26, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway Company extends to National Home.

June 13, 1879 Ellsworth is busily re-gauged all his lines.

August 14, 1879 Cream City Railway orders six cars from Stephenson Cars. Not exceeding 12 feet.

August 15, 1879 Elizabeth (National Avenue) terminus is at 6th Avenue (S. 11th Street); Railroad Street (Greenfield Avenue) terminus is at 22nd Avenue (S. 27th Street).

October 14, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway prefers horses as does West Side Street Railway, but Cream City Railway like mules.

October 20, 1879 West Side Street Railway opens extension to 12th & Walnut.

January 30, 1880 Clinton Street (Kinnickinnic) car bans are enlarged for Cream City Railway.

February 29, 1880 Cream City Railway operates 7 miles; Milwaukee City 9 miles; West Side Railway 5 miles.

March 10, 1880 Milwaukee City Railway to build storage buildings.

April 1, 1880 Ellsworth will build temporary track from National Avenue to National Home for Soldiers Reunion.

April 23, 1880 New cars are added to Railroad to 3rd Streets route of greater capacity though less with eight than old style cars in use.

May 17, 1880 New Iron Bridge is affected at West Water Street from the heat so as to interfere with trolley cars going over it.

June 15, 1880 Cream City Railway carried 37,000 during the reunion encampment for Civil War veterans.

August 2, 1880 West Side Street Railway completes 12th Street extension.

August 8, 1880 Walnut Street to 16th Street will have double tracks.

September 12, 1880 Forest Home Cemetery bus shuttle schedule announced.

Cream City Railway carried 37,000 during the reunion encampment for Civil War veterans.

June 15, 1880

March 22, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway overhauling 4 cars. Cars run 80 mile per day and are renovated every 3 months.

April 12, 1879 Removing tracks on Walnut Street from 3-7th Streets and building line on State Street from West Water Street to 7th Street and to Walnut Street.

May 5, 1879 New line opens on State Street & 7th Street. Peter Bell given “May drivers Award”.

May 10, 1879 A turntable is installed at the terminus at 4th Avenue and Mitchell Street.

May 26, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway Company extends to National Home.

June 13, 1879 Ellsworth is busily re-gauged all his lines.

August 14, 1879 Cream City Railway orders six cars from Stephenson Cars. Not exceeding 12 feet.

August 15, 1879 Elizabeth (National Avenue) terminus is at 6th Avenue (S. 11th Street); Railroad Street (Greenfield Avenue) terminus is at 22nd Avenue (S. 27th Street).

October 14, 1879 Milwaukee City Railway prefers horses as does West Side Street Railway, but Cream City Railway like mules.

October 20, 1879 West Side Street Railway opens extension to 12th & Walnut.

January 30, 1880 Clinton Street (Kinnickinnic) car bans are enlarged for Cream City Railway.

February 29, 1880 Cream City Railway operates 7 miles; Milwaukee City 9 miles; West Side Railway 5 miles.

March 10, 1880 Milwaukee City Railway to build storage buildings.

April 1, 1880 Ellsworth will build temporary track from National Avenue to National Home for Soldiers Reunion.

April 23, 1880 New cars are added to Railroad to 3rd Streets route of greater capacity though less with eight than old style cars in use.

May 17, 1880 New Iron Bridge is affected at West Water Street from the heat so as to interfere with trolley cars going over it.

June 15, 1880 Cream City Railway carried 37,000 during the reunion encampment for Civil War veterans.

August 2, 1880 West Side Street Railway completes 12th Street extension.

August 8, 1880 Walnut Street to 16th Street will have double tracks.

September 12, 1880 Forest Home Cemetery bus shuttle schedule announced.

January 3, 1881 New waiting room installed on Kinnickinnic Avenue, Cream City Railway.

April 16, 1881 Herdic Coach Line is to be opened when coaches arrive: Union Depot, Lake Street Broadway, Wisconsin Marshall, Division, Prospect to Sherman House on the North Point. Two kinds of coaches: 1-horse 8- passenger, and 2-horse 16-passenger. Coaches are unique because they are low slung and have a side door; can also be installed for winter with runners, hence truly all-year.

May 31, 1881 Waiting for new open cars from Jones Factory at Schenectady.

December 5, 1881 Peter McGeoch & Alex Mitchell have purchased Milwaukee City Railway with assistant from John Plankinton, George Wheatcroft, and John Johnston.

December 10, 1881 Metropolitan Company Wants to build line on Michigan, Broadway, Oneida-Wells, 5th Street, Cedar, 8th, Chestnut to city limits. Mark Tyson wants to build line on Michigan, Broadway, Lake, Barclay, Florida, 1st Avenue, Park, Muskego, and Railroad to limits.

January 5, 1882 Planning extension on Washington Street from Reed to 8th Avenue south to Railroad Street, West to Muskego Avenue to Forest Home Cemetery. All to be double track. National Avenue line to be extended west to the end of the pavement. Will erect large 2-story barn for car storage (2nd Street).

February 20, 1882 New stables nearly completed.

March 17, 1882 Replacing track on Walnut Street from 30- 7th Streets (Had been removed in 1879).

April 9, 1882 Extending track on National Avenue.

April 13, 1882 Peter McGeoch added new cars “To be the finest brought to Milwaukee.”

April 17, 1882 West Side Street Railway lays track to 8th & Center Streets.

April 18, 1882 Milwaukee City Railway receives two new cars.

April 23, 1882 Cars are running to 15th Avenue (21st Street) on National Avenue.

April 27, 1882 Milwaukee City Railway orders 16 new cars.

April 30, 1882 Immense car barn to be built immediately on 2nd Street south of new barn recently completed constructed of brick costing $12,000.

May 20, 1882 Laying of track on Washington Street between 5-56th Avenues. Milwaukee City Railway intends to macadamize tracks.

May 25, 1882 A bell punch collection system is introduced on all cars.

Peter McGeoch added new cars “To be the finest brought to Milwaukee.”

April 13, 1882

June 14, 1882 Service begins to “Shooting Park.” Milwaukee City Railway Company

July 1, 1882 Cream City completed new car barn of Farwell Avenue.

July 16, 1882 By May 1st Milwaukee City Railway paid for only 25 cars a license fee of $10.00 each. They want to pays for fees only on the average number of cars that run each day. Mayor ordered count on cars for one day and found that 40 were running; with cars in the barns at a total of 60. Milwaukee City Railway came up with 15 more license fees.

July 18, 1882 McGeoch insists that he has only 46 cars.

July 25, 1882 Cars are running from Chestnut Street. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

August 4, 1882 Cream City Railway asks to extend tracks to North Avenue.

August 12, 1882 Drivers receive $1.50 per day for an average of 10 hours.

September 30, 1882 Received several new cars to be used on the line from Schlitz Park to the Cemetery.

October 9, 1882Trouble is brewing all summer over car licenses. Each car owned to cost $10.00, but railways want to pay by average cars run is they pay at all by May 1st. Common council is considering an ordinance to make railways actually pay for each car and to post each license inside the car in plain sight of the public, and to appoint a licensing committee to see to the process of licensing rather than the Mayor’s office.

December 11, 1882 Milwaukee City Railway employees 150 men, 413 horse, 46 cars, and runs 39 cars daily. Lines include: 2rd & Railroad Streets, Walnut Street, Washington & State Street, Chestnut Street, Muskego Avenue. Drivers average 11 hours per day, 7 days per week, salary being $9-12 per week.

March 29, 1883 Cream City Railway distinguished lines by colored banners and lights.

April 5, 1883 Cream City Railway starting build new cars at south side shops.

April 6, 1883 McGeoch is contemplating in extending his line to Soldiers Home.

September 3, 1883 The Forest Home Line is halted for sewer installation. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

November 22, 1883 A car rolling along between Grand Avenue and Sycamore, loaded with passengers, skewered by loose rail which pierced the floor near the front wheels and fixed itself up through the rear roof.

December 29, 1883 Cream City Railway installs stoves in all cars.

A car rolling along between Grand Avenue and Sycamore, loaded with passengers, skewered by loose rail which pierced the floor near the front wheels and fixed itself up through the rear roof.

November 22, 1883

March 24, 1884 West Side Street Railway extends line to Schlitz Park.

April 7, 1884 Milwaukee City Railways added several new cars.

April 12, 1884 Cream City Railway runs on Mitchell Street to Forest Home Avenue.

April 27, 1884 Forest Home Line is running again.

May 7, 1884 Milwaukee City Railway took out 60-license for 1884.

May 26, 1884 City of Milwaukee has licensed 120 cars and 11 buses on all street railways.

June 20, 1884 Milwaukee City Railway will be receiving two new open cars and six enclosed.

July 6, 1884 Horse kept in barns for the Forest Home line. Extensive facilities on West Water- 2nd Street will have to relocate soon to the ends of the lines to put cars on the line more efficiently. Milwaukee City Railways runs 80 cars.

October 7, 1884 Granted permission to extend Cream City tracks north on Murray.

December 23, 1884 Wants to extend 8th Street track to Baseball Park on Wright Street from terminus at 8th and Wright Streets. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

January 6, 1885 Permission is given to extend 8th Street to Baseball Park. Milwaukee City Railway Company.

May 21, 1885 Cream City Railway completes extension to Mitchell Heights.

October 29, 1885 Bay View residents are dissatisfied with service provided by Cream City Railway.

February 14, 1886 Cream City Railway is asked through a petition to build on Cass and Brady Streets.

May 8, 1886 Cream City extension is opened on Forest Home Avenue.

August 16, 1886 Bay View residents favor the Russell Avenue line by Cream City.

May 7, 1887 West Side Street Railway completes extension to Union Depot.

August 4, 1887 Cream City completes the Russell Avenue extension.

August 15, 1887Milwaukee City Railway demonstrates Van Depeole electric cars as successful.

November 23, 1887 Cream City Railway asks permission to run cars over the Milwaukee City Railway lines.

City of Milwaukee has licensed 120 cars and 11 buses on all street railways.

May 26, 1884

January 1, 1888 Milwaukee City Railway reorganized as “Milwaukee City Railroad Company.”

April 21, 1888 Cream City Railway adds new cars on Russell and Island Avenue lines.

July 9, 1888 Cream City Railway runs “Owl Cars”.

August 14, 1888 A time schedule is introduced by Cream City Railway.

December 10, 1888 West Side Street Railway reorganized as “West Side Railway Company.”

June 17, 1889 Expanded service on Forest Home Avenue is provided by Cream City Railway.

October 18, 1889 Cream City Railway is purchased by W. H. Bradley.

December 27, 1889 Cream City Railway starts converting their lines to electric railway.

April 3, 1890 Electric service is introduced on West Side Railway Company lines.

April 21, 1890 Cream City Railway is purchased by Pittsburgh capitalists.

July 21, 1890 Cream City Railway become the property of Edison-Villard syndicate.

July 23, 1890 Milwaukee City Railroad Company sold to Milwaukee Street Railway Company.

August 12, 1890 Cream City Railway cars to Schlitz Park.

September 12, 1890 Milwaukee Street Railway Company starts work on Soldiers Home extension.

September 15, 1890 Cream City Railway is sold to North American Company and transferred to Milwaukee Street Railway Company.

November 19, 1890 Milwaukee Street Railway Company announces extension of Greenfield Avenue line.

Scroll to Top